The Vertigo Years
Title The Vertigo Years PDF eBook
Author Philipp Blom
Publisher Basic Books (AZ)
Pages 490
Release 2010-11-02
Genre History
ISBN 0465020291

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Examines how changes from the Industrial Revolution prior to World War I brought about radical transformation in society, changes in education, and massive migration in population that led to one of the bloodiest events in history.



The Vertigo Years
Title The Vertigo Years PDF eBook
Author Philipp Blom
Publisher George Weidenfeld & Nicholson
Pages 496
Release 2008
Genre Europe
ISBN

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Europe, early in the twentieth century: a world adrift, a pulsating era of creativity and contradictions. The hot topics of the day - terrorism and globalisation, immigration, consumerism, the lack of moral values and rivalling superpowers - could make one forget that it is a century ago that this era vanished in the trenches of the Somme, of Ypres, and of Passchendaele. Or did it? The closer one looks, the more this world seems like ours: feminism and quantum thedory, atonal music and democratisation, mass communication and commercial branding, genetics, state-sponsored genocide, colonialism, consumerism and racism, radioactivity and psychoanalysis are all terms first used during this period. This was a time radically unlike the Victorian era that preceded it, a time in which old certainties broke down and many people lost their bearings. At the heart of this vibrant Europe, was a contradiction that would cause its collapse: the new, modern world of mass production, urban life, technological warfare and a rapidly growing working class was still ruled by men - Kaiser Wilhelm, Tsar Nicolas II, and the Austro-Hungarian Emperor Francis Joseph among them - who thought in the chivalric and paternalistic categories of earlier generations, prefering the image of dashing cavalry officers to the prosaic slaughter of the machine gun, and national mythology to political cohesion and democracy. The eventual scope of the catastrophe often obscures the fact that the great cultural divide in Europe's history lies before 1914. This book will bring to life the immediacy of the lives and issues of this fascinating and flawed period.



The Vertigo Years
Title The Vertigo Years PDF eBook
Author Philipp Blom
Publisher Hachette UK
Pages 480
Release 2012-10-18
Genre History
ISBN 0297856219

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A panorama of Europe, 1900-1914, describing the cultural, economic and political life before the First World War. Europe, early in the twentieth century: a world adrift, a pulsating era of creativity and contradictions. But did this era vanish in the trenches of the Somme, of Ypres, and of Passchendaele? Look closer and the more this world seems like ours: feminism, democratisation, commercial branding, genetics, consumerism and racism, radioactivity and psychoanalysis are all terms first used during this period. This was a time in which old certainties broke down and many people lost their bearings. At the heart of this vibrant Europe, was a contradiction that would cause its collapse: the new, modern world of mass production, urban life, technological warfare and a rapidly growing working class that was still ruled by men who preferred the image of dashing cavalry officers to the prosaic slaughter of the machine gun, and national mythology to political cohesion and democracy. The eventual scope of the catastrophe often obscures the fact that the great cultural divide in Europe's history lies before 1914. This book brings to life the immediacy of the lives and issues of this fascinating and flawed period.



Read On...History
Title Read On...History PDF eBook
Author Tina Frolund
Publisher Bloomsbury Publishing USA
Pages 212
Release 2013-10-21
Genre Language Arts & Disciplines
ISBN 1610694325

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Make history come alive! This book helps librarians and teachers as well as readers themselves find books they will enjoy—titles that will animate and explain the past, entertain, and expand their minds. This invaluable resource offers reading lists of contemporary and classic non-fiction history books and historical fiction, covering all time periods throughout the world, and including practically all manner of human endeavors. Every book included is hand-selected as an entertaining and enlightening read! Organized by appeal characteristics, this book will help readers zero in on the history books they will like best—for instance, titles that emphasize character, tell a specific type of historical story, convey a mood, or are presented in a particular setting. Every book listed has been recommended based on the author's research, and has proved to be a satisfying and worthwhile read.



Tennessee's Experience during the First World War
Title Tennessee's Experience during the First World War PDF eBook
Author Michael E. Birdwell
Publisher Univ. of Tennessee Press
Pages 474
Release 2024-02-02
Genre History
ISBN 1621905322

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“On the day that Archduke Franz Ferdinand, heir to the Austrian throne, was assassinated, Tennesseans worried about the weather,” Carole Bucy writes. Indeed, the war that began in Europe in 1914 was unimaginably remote from Tennessee—until it wasn’t. Drawing on a depth of research into a wide array of topics, this vanguard collection of essays aims to conceptualize World War I through the lens of Tennessee. The book begins by situating life in Tennessee within the greater context of the war in Europe, recounting America’s growing involvement in the Great War. As the volume unfolds, editor Michael E. Birdwell and the contributors weave together soldier narratives, politics and agribusiness, African American history, and present-day recollections to paint a picture of Tennessee’s Great War experience that is both informative and gripping. An essential addition to the broader historiography of the American experience during World War I, this collection of essays presents Tennessee stories that are close to home in more than just geography and lineage. By relating international conflict through the eyes of Tennessee’s own, editor Michael E. Birdwell and the contributing authors provide new opportunities for academics and general readers alike to engage with the Great War from a unique and—until now—untold perspective.



The Heirs to the Savoia Throne and the Construction of ‘Italianità’, 1860-1900
Title The Heirs to the Savoia Throne and the Construction of ‘Italianità’, 1860-1900 PDF eBook
Author Maria Christina Marchi
Publisher Springer Nature
Pages 298
Release 2022-05-26
Genre History
ISBN 3030845850

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This book explores the evolution of the role of the heirs to the throne of Italy between 1860 and 1900. It focuses on the future kings Umberto I (1844-1900) and Vittorio Emanuele III (1869-1947), and their respective spouses, Margherita of Savoia (1851-1926) and Elena of Montenegro (1873-1952). It sheds light on the soft power the Italian royals were attempting to generate, by identifying and examining four specific areas of monarchical activity: firstly, the heirs’ public role and the manner in which they attempted to craft an Italian identity through a process of self-presentation; secondly, the national, royal, linguistic and military education of the heirs; thirdly, the promotion of a family-centred dynasty deploying both male and female elements in the public realm; and finally the readiness to embrace different modes of mobility in the construction of italianità. By analysing the growing importance of the royal heirs and their performance on the public stage in post-Risorgimento Italy, this study investigates the attempted construction of a cohesive national identity through the crown and, more specifically, the heirs to the throne.



Making War on the World
Title Making War on the World PDF eBook
Author Mark Shirk
Publisher Columbia University Press
Pages 152
Release 2022-03-01
Genre Political Science
ISBN 0231554303

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The state bounds politics: it constructs and enforces boundaries that separate what it controls from what lies outside its domain. However, states face a variety of threats that cross and challenge their geographical and conceptual boundaries. Transnational violent actors that transcend these boundaries also defy the state’s claims to political authority and legitimacy. Mark Shirk examines historical and contemporary state responses to transnational violence to develop a new account of the making of global orders. He considers a series of crises that plagued the state system in different eras: golden-age piracy in the eighteenth century, anarchist “propagandists of the deed” at the turn of the twentieth, and al-Qaeda in recent years. Shirk argues that states redraw conceptual boundaries, such as between “international” and “domestic,” to make sense of and defeat transnational threats. In response to forms of political violence that challenged boundaries, states developed creative responses that included new forms of control, surveillance, and rights. As a result, these responses gradually made and transformed the state and global order. Shirk draws on extensive archival research and interviews with policy makers and experts, and he explores the implications for understandings of state formation. Combining rich detail and theoretical insight, Making War on the World reveals the role of pirates, anarchists, and terrorists in shaping global order.