The Black Colleges of Atlanta

The Black Colleges of Atlanta
Title The Black Colleges of Atlanta PDF eBook
Author Rodney T. Cohen
Publisher Arcadia Publishing
Pages 128
Release 2012-09-18
Genre History
ISBN 143961069X

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By 1865, although Atlanta and the Confederacy still lay wounded in the wake of the Union victory, black higher education began its thrust for recognition. Some of the first of the American colleges formed specifically for the education of black students were founded in Atlanta, Georgia. These schools continue, over a century later, to educate, train and inspire. Through an engaging collection of images and informative captions, their story begins to unfold. Atlanta University was the pioneer college for blacks in the state of Georgia. Founded in 1865, it was followed by Morehouse College in 1867, Clark University in 1869, and Spelman and Morris Brown Colleges in 1881. By 1929, Atlanta University discontinued undergraduate work and affiliated with Morehouse and Spelman in a plan known as the "Atlanta University System." A formal agreement of cooperation including all of the Atlanta colleges occurred in 1957, solidifying the common goal and principles each school was founded upon-to make literate the black youth of America. Today, the shared resources of each institution provide a unique and challenging experience for young Africa Americans seeking higher education. The schools boast a long and distinguished list of alumni and scholars, including W.E.B. DuBois, James Weldon Johnson, Martin Luther King, Henry O. Tanner, and C. Eric Lincoln.




Historically Black Colleges and Universities

Historically Black Colleges and Universities
Title Historically Black Colleges and Universities PDF eBook
Author F. Erik Brooks
Publisher Bloomsbury Publishing USA
Pages 386
Release 2011-09-13
Genre Reference
ISBN 0313394164

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This exhaustive analysis of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) throughout history discusses the institutions and the major events, individuals, and organizations that have contributed to their existence. The oldest HBCU, Cheyney University of Pennsylvania, was founded in 1837 by Quaker philanthropist Richard Humphreys as the Institute for Colored Youth. By 1902, at least 85 such schools had been established and, in subsequent years, the total grew to 105. Today approximately 16 percent of America's black college students are enrolled in HBCUs. Historically Black Colleges and Universities: An Encyclopedia brings the stories of these schools together in a comprehensive volume that explores the origin and history of each Historically Black College and University in the United States. Major founders and contributors to HBCUs, including whites, free blacks, churches, and states, are discussed and distinguished alumni are profiled. Specific examples of the impact of HBCUs and their alumni on American culture and the social and political history of the United States are also examined. In addition to looking at the HBCUs themselves, the book analyzes historical events and legislation of the past 174 years that impacted the founding, funding, and growth of these history-making schools.




Black Colleges of Atlanta

Black Colleges of Atlanta
Title Black Colleges of Atlanta PDF eBook
Author Rodney T. Cohen
Publisher Arcadia Publishing
Pages 132
Release 2000
Genre History
ISBN 9780738505541

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By 1865, although Atlanta and the Confederacy still lay wounded in the wake of the Union victory, black higher education began its thrust for recognition. Some of the first of the American colleges formed specifically for the education of black students were founded in Atlanta, Georgia. These schools continue, over a century later, to educate, train and inspire. Through an engaging collection of images and informative captions, their story begins to unfold. Atlanta University was the pioneer college for blacks in the state of Georgia. Founded in 1865, it was followed by Morehouse College in 1867, Clark University in 1869, and Spelman and Morris Brown Colleges in 1881. By 1929, Atlanta University discontinued undergraduate work and affiliated with Morehouse and Spelman in a plan known as the "Atlanta University System." A formal agreement of cooperation including all of the Atlanta colleges occurred in 1957, solidifying the common goal and principles each school was founded upon-to make literate the black youth of America. Today, the shared resources of each institution provide a unique and challenging experience for young Africa Americans seeking higher education. The schools boast a long and distinguished list of alumni and scholars, including W.E.B. DuBois, James Weldon Johnson, Martin Luther King, Henry O. Tanner, and C. Eric Lincoln.




Show Thyself a Man

Show Thyself a Man
Title Show Thyself a Man PDF eBook
Author Mixon, Gregory
Publisher University Press of Florida
Pages 441
Release 2016-07-25
Genre History
ISBN 0813055873

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In Show Thyself a Man, Gregory Mixon explores the ways African Americans in postbellum Georgia used the militia as a vehicle to secure full citizenship, respect, and a more stable place in society. As citizen-soldiers, black men were empowered to get involved in politics, secure their own financial independence, and publicly commemorate black freedom with celebrations such as Emancipation Day. White Georgians, however, used the militia as a different symbol of freedom--to ensure the postwar white right to rule. This book is a forty-year history of black militia service in Georgia and the determined disbandment process that whites undertook to destroy it, connecting this chapter of the post-emancipation South to the larger history of militia participation by African-descendant people through the Western hemisphere and Latin America.




The Rise and Progress of Negro Colleges in Georgia, 1865-1949

The Rise and Progress of Negro Colleges in Georgia, 1865-1949
Title The Rise and Progress of Negro Colleges in Georgia, 1865-1949 PDF eBook
Author Willard Range
Publisher University of Georgia Press
Pages 268
Release 2009-08-01
Genre Education
ISBN 0820334529

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Published in 1951, this study looks at the social, economic, political, and historical aspects of the development of higher education for African Americans in Georgia.




History of Morehouse College

History of Morehouse College
Title History of Morehouse College PDF eBook
Author Benjamin Brawley
Publisher Cosimo, Inc.
Pages 246
Release 2009-01-01
Genre History
ISBN 1605206652

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Founded only two years after the end of the Civil War, Atlanta's Morehouse College to this day remains one of the few traditional men's colleges in the United States. Originally dedicated to an all-black student body that was focused on studying the ministry and education, today the school welcomes students of all races to a full range of liberal-arts studies. The extraordinary history of the school was first explored in 1917's *History of Morehouse College,* written by the then-dean of the college. From its founding and early presidents to the roster of illustrious alumni and their work through the early years of the 20th century, this is an important document of African-American history, and includes the school's original charter and lists of students and graduates from 1871 through 1916. African-American author and educator BENJAMIN GRIFFITH BRAWLEY (1882-1939) wrote extensively on black culture.




The Legend of the Black Mecca

The Legend of the Black Mecca
Title The Legend of the Black Mecca PDF eBook
Author Maurice J. Hobson
Publisher UNC Press Books
Pages 337
Release 2017-10-03
Genre Social Science
ISBN 1469635364

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For more than a century, the city of Atlanta has been associated with black achievement in education, business, politics, media, and music, earning it the nickname "the black Mecca." Atlanta's long tradition of black education dates back to Reconstruction, and produced an elite that flourished in spite of Jim Crow, rose to leadership during the civil rights movement, and then took power in the 1970s by building a coalition between white progressives, business interests, and black Atlantans. But as Maurice J. Hobson demonstrates, Atlanta's political leadership--from the election of Maynard Jackson, Atlanta's first black mayor, through the city's hosting of the 1996 Olympic Games--has consistently mishandled the black poor. Drawn from vivid primary sources and unnerving oral histories of working-class city-dwellers and hip-hop artists from Atlanta's underbelly, Hobson argues that Atlanta's political leadership has governed by bargaining with white business interests to the detriment of ordinary black Atlantans. In telling this history through the prism of the black New South and Atlanta politics, policy, and pop culture, Hobson portrays a striking schism between the black political elite and poor city-dwellers, complicating the long-held view of Atlanta as a mecca for black people.