Relentless Pursuit

Relentless Pursuit
Title Relentless Pursuit PDF eBook
Author Donna Foote
Publisher Vintage
Pages 354
Release 2008-04-15
Genre Education
ISBN 0307269396

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When Locke High School opened its doors in 1967, the residents of Watts celebrated it as a sign of the changes promised by Los Angeles. But four decades later, first-year Teach for America recruits Rachelle, Phillip, Hrag, and Taylor are greeted by a school that looks more like a prison, with bars, padlocks, and chains all over. With little training and experience, these four will be asked to produce academic gains in students who are among the most disadvantaged in the country. Relentless Pursuit lays bare the experiences of these four teachers to evaluate the strengths and peculiarities of Teach for America and a social reality that has become inescapable.




Excellence for All

Excellence for All
Title Excellence for All PDF eBook
Author Jack Schneider
Publisher Stanford University
Pages 225
Release 2010
Genre
ISBN

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Excellence For All: American Education Reform, 1983-2008 examines the history of school reform in the United States over the past quarter-century. Specifically, the work examines an approach to educational change best characterized by the phrase "excellence for all"—an equity-focused policy phenomenon uniquely situated for the policymaking context of the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. The idea of promoting excellence for all students united a broad enough coalition to pursue a truly national reform effort and captured the imaginations of leaders in state and local government, at philanthropic foundations, in colleges and universities, and in school districts across the country. Led by a corps of self-styled educational entrepreneurs aggressively pursuing reforms that they could take "to scale, " the movement sought to remake the American high school piece by piece. The dissertation examines this reform movement through the nation's three largest districts—New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles—and through three particular change efforts: a physical plant reform (the small schools movement), a personnel reform (Teach For America), and a curricular reform (the Advanced Placement Program). The work aims to establish the ways in which this most recent era of school reform represented a departure from previous reform eras, strives to explain the movement's broad appeal, and ultimately, aims to understand its shortcomings by exploring the assumptions underlying the excellence for all approach and the tradeoffs required by it.




Teaching Teachers

Teaching Teachers
Title Teaching Teachers PDF eBook
Author James W. Fraser
Publisher JHU Press
Pages 248
Release 2018-10-01
Genre Education
ISBN 1421426366

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Teacher education in America has changed dramatically in the past thirty years—with major implications for how our kids are taught. As recently as 1990, if a person wanted to become a public school teacher in the United States, he or she needed to attend an accredited university education program. Less than three decades later, the variety of routes into teaching is staggering. In Teaching Teachers, education historians James W. Fraser and Lauren Lefty look at these alternative programs through the lens of the past. Fraser and Lefty explain how, beginning in 1986, an extraordinary range of new teaching programs emerged, most of which moved teacher education out of universities. In some school districts and charter schools, superintendents started their own teacher preparation programs—sometimes in conjunction with universities, sometimes not. Other teacher educators designed blended programs, creating collaboration between university teacher education programs and other parts of the university, linking with school districts and independent providers, and creating a range of novel options. Fraser and Lefty argue that three factors help explain this dramatic shift in how teachers are trained: an ethos that market forces were the solution to social problems; long-term dissatisfaction with the inadequacies of university-based teacher education; and the frustration of school superintendents with teachers themselves, who can seem both underprepared and too quick to challenge established policy. Surveying which programs are effective and which are not, this book also examines the impact of for-profit teacher training in the classroom. Casting light on the historical and social forces that led to the sea change in the ways American teachers are prepared, Teaching Teachers is a substantial and unbiased history of a controversial topic.




Inequality in America

Inequality in America
Title Inequality in America PDF eBook
Author Stephen M. Caliendo
Publisher Routledge
Pages 265
Release 2018-05-15
Genre Political Science
ISBN 0429975171

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Why does inequality have such a hold on American society and public policy? And what can we, as citizens, do about it? Inequality in America takes an in-depth look at race, class and gender-based inequality, across a wide range of issues from housing and education to crime, employment and health. Caliendo explores how individual attitudes can affect public opinion and lawmakers' policy solutions. He also illustrates how these policies result in systemic barriers to advancement that often then contribute to individual perceptions. This cycle of disadvantage and advantage can be difficult-though not impossible-to break. "Representing" and "What Can I Do?" feature boxes throughout the book highlight key public figures who have worked to combat inequality and encourage students to take action to do the same. The second edition has been thoroughly revised to include the most current data and to cover recent issues and events like the 2016 elections and the Black Lives Matter movement. It now also includes a brand-new chapter on crime and criminal justice and an expanded discussion of immigration. Concise and accessible, Inequality in America paves the way for students to think critically about the attitudes, behaviors and structures of inequality.




From Teach For America to Teach For China

From Teach For America to Teach For China
Title From Teach For America to Teach For China PDF eBook
Author Sara Lam
Publisher Routledge
Pages 229
Release 2019-11-13
Genre Education
ISBN 0429833652

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This book examines the role of Teach For China in addressing educational equity and expanding public participation in education. The author uses the case of Teach For China to explore the broader theme of the mobility of education models between contexts characterized by neoliberalism and those characterized by strong state control. Transnational advocacy networks are increasingly influential in the education policy making process. These networks, comprised of entrepreneurs and education corporations, think tanks, philanthropists, and government agencies, facilitate the global mobility of policy models. It is widely accepted that an education model should not be transplanted from one context to another without careful consideration of how contextual differences might impact the model’s effectiveness. The book explores the argument that the same model is not only quantitatively different in terms of effectiveness, but that models can play qualitatively different roles in neoliberal and strong-state contexts, sometimes moving education reform in opposite directions. The book will appeal to anyone interested in global teacher education reform and equity in education.




A Chance to Make History

A Chance to Make History
Title A Chance to Make History PDF eBook
Author Wendy Kopp
Publisher Hachette UK
Pages 240
Release 2011-01-25
Genre Education
ISBN 1586489267

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Since 1990, Teach For America has been building a movement to end educational inequity in America. Now its founder, Wendy Kopp, shares the lessons learned from the experiences of more than 25,000 teachers and alumni who have taught and led schools in low-income communities during those years. A Chance to Make History cuts through the noise of today's debates to describe precisely what it will take to provide transformational education -- education that changes the academic and life trajectories predicted by children's socioeconomic backgrounds. Sharing her experiences in some of the country's most underserved communities, Kopp introduces leaders at the classroom, school, and system levels who, driven by passionate belief in their students' potential, have set out to accomplish what most think impossible. Their inspiring stories show how we can provide children facing all the challenges of poverty with an excellent education, and that doing so involves the same ingredients that account for success in any endeavor: visionary leadership that sets ambitious goals and puts forth the energy and discipline to reach them. Kopp's experiences and insights also shine light on why we have not made more progress against educational inequity -- how and why the intense but misguided quest for easy answers actually distracts from the hard work of expanding on the growing pockets of success in low-income communities -- and on what we need to do now to increase the pace of change. America's failure to educate millions of children to fulfill their potential is a crisis that strikes at our fundamental ideals and health as a nation.A Chance to Make History offers tangible evidence that we can change direction and provide all children the opportunity to attain an excellent education.




Collective Unravelings of the Hegemonic Web

Collective Unravelings of the Hegemonic Web
Title Collective Unravelings of the Hegemonic Web PDF eBook
Author Becky L. Noël Smith
Publisher IAP
Pages 269
Release 2014-08-01
Genre Education
ISBN 1623967791

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Collective Unravelings of the Hegemonic Web represents the culmination of work that emerged from 2013 Curriculum & Pedagogy annual conference. The notion of the hegemonic web is the defining theme of the volume. In this collection, authors struggle to unravel and take apart pieces of the complex web that are so deeply embedded into normative ways of thinking, being and making meaning. They also grapple with understanding the role that hegemony plays and the influence that it has on identity, curriculum, teaching and learning. Finally, scholars included in this volume describe their efforts to engage and undergo counter-hegemonic movements by sharing their stories and struggles.